Author Topic: Beaver Trapper  (Read 2850 times)

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Len

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Beaver Trapper
« on: August 12, 2007, 06:04:04 PM »
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vadi nasskott

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Re: Beaver Trapper
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2007, 12:53:57 AM »
Just a couple of articles than pertain to this subject  http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-06/agu-bdc060506.php
                                                                        http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007-01/uoa-bhf011007.php

« Last Edit: August 14, 2007, 12:58:34 AM by vadi nasskott »
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Flue

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Re: Beaver Trapper
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2007, 06:11:08 AM »
Whats a beaver pelt worth these days?  Used to get $35 in the mid 80's.  a couple feet of 1/8" cable, beaver urine and a jar of creamy peanut butter and a couple of sticks is all you will need.  :-15

TimF

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Re: Beaver Trapper
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2007, 08:20:31 AM »
I always used a .22 with a night scope to solve my Beaver problem.
Ever try a Dynamite fly?

gopack1

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Re: Beaver Trapper
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2007, 11:22:03 AM »
If the Flame Room were still around I might say that "Beaver Trapper" was my nickname in college, but since it's been flushed I won't go there.   :P
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Clay

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Re: Beaver Trapper
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2007, 03:32:42 PM »
I use to chase fur as well  ;D

I'll leave that open ended at the top since I don't want to get into any trouble, but I did it with a 243 win.  The fox and yodel dogs were great and I even tried to call in raccoons with a fight call on more than one occation.  The raccoons are overrunning our parks and their crap is very bad mojo for the kids that play there.  If their parents knew more about raccoon feces they wouldn't let little Tommy play in some of the city parks.  I drive through one park after work about 3 am and see many of the $30 critters walking around that would make someone who isn't beaten to death by the anti-fur crowd proud to wear.  Again I promote conservationalism in that wise use of the resource is appropriate. 

Back to your regularly scheduled discussion of beaver chasing. :P

Rick

vadi nasskott

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Re: Beaver Trapper
« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2007, 12:12:17 AM »
http://www.beaversww.org/beaver.html  gives a good explanation why Mother Nature entrusted to the beaver to keep our streams and wetlands healthy.
When you reach that certain age I hope you enjoy the "charisma" that goes with the wisdom and the skill you have perfected over the years.

Perry

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Re: Beaver Trapper
« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2007, 06:23:13 AM »
Vadi,

You’ve given us some good stuff on beavers. But, sadly sometimes, we have managed (or mismanaged) the environment for centuries to favor some species over others. Should we manage for beavers, or for trout, when they seem to be in conflict? On this web board, the answer is going to be trout.

In certain locales in NE Minnesota where I grew up, beaver dams were helpful to the local brook trout population. But I know of locales where this was not so.

From the article: “Estimates of the current population are as low as five percent of those present prior to European settlement. Nonetheless, as beaver reclaim some former territory, conflicts with humans arise.” No kidding. Massachusetts banned all trapping a few years ago. There was a program a year or so ago on PBS that featured a Massachusetts homeowner who was precluded from removing the beavers that had moved, literally, into his yard. He thought the ducks that came to the pond were fine, but he had a problem with the foot of water in his basement. He was there before the beavers arrived, they were destroying his home, and he had no lawful recourse.

In our wisdom, should we manage the environment in man’s best interests? And if so, will the debate ever end as to what man’s best interests really are?

Todd T

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Re: Beaver Trapper
« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2007, 06:54:01 AM »
Vadi,

You’ve given us some good stuff on beavers. But, sadly sometimes, we have managed (or mismanaged) the environment for centuries to favor some species over others. Should we manage for beavers, or for trout, when they seem to be in conflict? On this web board, the answer is going to be trout.

In certain locales in NE Minnesota where I grew up, beaver dams were helpful to the local brook trout population. But I know of locales where this was not so.

From the article: “Estimates of the current population are as low as five percent of those present prior to European settlement. Nonetheless, as beaver reclaim some former territory, conflicts with humans arise.” No kidding. Massachusetts banned all trapping a few years ago. There was a program a year or so ago on PBS that featured a Massachusetts homeowner who was precluded from removing the beavers that had moved, literally, into his yard. He thought the ducks that came to the pond were fine, but he had a problem with the foot of water in his basement. He was there before the beavers arrived, they were destroying his home, and he had no lawful recourse.

In our wisdom, should we manage the environment in man’s best interests? And if so, will the debate ever end as to what man’s best interests really are?


Hmmmm, might be time to start leaving raw meat by the edge of the pond. Feral dogs, urban coytotes and such tend not to make good neighbors, or simply do some clear cutting of beaver food. 

No need to do anything directly, just introduce them to the new neighbors and put them on a diet.
 :-\

vadi nasskott

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Re: Beaver Trapper
« Reply #9 on: August 19, 2007, 11:56:57 AM »
"Beaver dams were helpful to the local brook trout."------------I was reading an article that the European Beaver does not build dams but instead digs holes in the banks.The European Beaver is probably more suitable for the habitat of the European Brown Trout and the North America Beaver is beneficial to the Brook Trout as Mother Nature intended.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2007, 12:01:35 PM by vadi nasskott »
When you reach that certain age I hope you enjoy the "charisma" that goes with the wisdom and the skill you have perfected over the years.

Perry

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Re: Beaver Trapper
« Reply #10 on: August 19, 2007, 12:17:30 PM »
I have no idea what Mother Nature intended when She had beavers build dams in North America. Maybe She intended that the beavers have a safe winter home in streams with low winter flows, and the brook trout, in some locales, are symbiotic residents of the ponds. Vadi, you didn't quote the entire thought. "In certain locales in NE Minnesota where I grew up, beaver dams were helpful to the local brook trout population. But I know of locales where this was not so."

Actually, I have found "bank beaver" dens in Minnesota and Wisconsin, generally in streams that have consistent winter water flows. Twice I've seen beavers retreat to these bank holes. I've found a few others by innocently stepping on their roofs, breaking through the ceilings (I've got to get to the gym and start watching my weight), and hanging my feet in their living rooms.

Flue

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Re: Beaver Trapper
« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2007, 01:10:45 PM »
I've found a few others by innocently stepping on their roofs, breaking through the ceilings (I've got to get to the gym and start watching my weight), and hanging my feet in their living rooms.

You could just buy a mirror and watch your weight while you tie flies in the winter.  Should be a lot cheaper than what a gym will charge you to look in one of their mirrors.  On the upside, the scenery may be better at the gym, or at least always changing.  :-X

Tsuga_canadensis

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Re: Beaver Trapper
« Reply #12 on: August 20, 2007, 01:57:23 PM »

Actually, I have found "bank beaver" dens in Minnesota and Wisconsin, generally in streams that have consistent winter water flows. Twice I've seen beavers retreat to these bank holes. I've found a few others by innocently stepping on their roofs, breaking through the ceilings (I've got to get to the gym and start watching my weight), and hanging my feet in their living rooms.

I can think of a couple of West-central WI trout rivers that have beavers have tunneled under the banks -- no dams but a lot of beavers in the rivers and undercut banks.  My experience with their tunnels have been similar to yours.   :P
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